Archive for the 'Citizen Action' Category

The Next Step: Post-Arab Spring

Throughout the International Anti-Corruption Conference, we’ll post exclusive interviews about what happens after the workshops and panels are over. We’ll look at what was accomplished and what strategies participants can actually take back to their countries to fight corruption.

One of the topics that’s on the tip of everyone’s tongue here in Brasilia is the Arab Spring and the debate over what the next steps should be and whether change is happening fast enough. So, we decided to dedicate two episodes of The Next Step to different perspectives on what needs to happen in the Arab Region, post-Arab Spring.

Our first guest is an Iraqi parliamentarian from Kurdistan in Northern Iraq, Susan Shahab-Nouri.

Our next guest is Hadeel Qazzaz. She works with the NGO Integrity Action. She is from Palestine and just moved to Calgary, Canada.

The Next Step: Dirty Money

Throughout the International Anti-Corruption Conference, we’ll post exclusive interviews about what happens after the workshops and panels are over. We’ll look at what was accomplished and what strategies participants can actually take back to their countries to fight corruption.

One of the major obstacles to fighting corruption is dirty money and illicit financial flows. How do institutions restore people’s trust? And what key measures are needed to make sure transparency is rooted in the world of money.

After their panel, Patrick Alley, co-founder of Global Witness and Nicholas Shaxon, investigative journalist and author, joined me to talk about the next steps needed to curtail the flow of dirty money.

“Yo solo sé que tengo que pagar dos chelines para dar agua a mi cabra”

[English version]

“Solo soy una mujer de campo, yo no entiendo algunas de esas cosas, solo sé que tengo que pagar dos chelines para dar agua a mi cabra”. Aira Mohammed Ahmed, vecina de una pequeña aldea de Kenya, resume en pocas líneas el monumental obstáculo que organizaciones como Transparencia Intenacional enfrentan para combatir la corrupción: la falta de información.

Habitantes de comunidades pobres y analfabetas en cualquier lugar del globo, tienen derecho a servicios básicos como escuelas, centros de salud o agua y hay programas millonarios dedicados a asegurar que los reciben. Hay también decenas de organizaciones involucradas en su cumplimiento, pero los recursos que les pertenecen acaban, muchas veces, en manos de otros.

Y si se pregunta cuántas personas denuncian que no reciben lo que les corresponde verá que la cifra en Latinoamérica no llega al 8%, mientras que en Kenya se reduce al 5%, según los responsables de los proyectos en esas regiones reunidos en la 15 th IACC.

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“I have to pay two shillings to get water for my goat”

[Version Español]

“I’m just a country woman, I do not understand some of these things. All I know is I have to pay two shillings to get water for my goat,” Aira Mohammed Ahmed, a resident of a small village in Kenya, said. In just a few lines, she summarized the enormous obstacles that organizations like Transparency Intenational face in combating corruption: the lack of information.

Citizens of poverty stricken regions around the globe are entitled to certain basic services, like access to education, healthcare and even the most basic necessities like food and water. Indeed, there is a plethora of programs with millions of dollars allocated specifically to ensure that these goods and services are delivered to those in need. There are also several organizations, like United States Agency for International Development (USAID), that monitor the funds from those programs once they´ve been distributed to ensure they are handled properly. But in many cases, the resources they´re meant to provide fall into the wrong hands.

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The Next Step: Corruption & Change in the Arab Region

Throughout the International Anti-Corruption Conference, we’ll post exclusive interviews about what happens after the workshops and panels are over. We’ll look at what was accomplished and what strategies participants can actually take back to their countries to fight corruption.

On this episode of The Next Step we look at corruption and transformation in the Arab region. Panelists and participants shared a variety of perspectives and there was a lot of debate, reflecting the complicated nature of the region post-Arab Spring.

After the session, we caught up with two people who’ve been in the thick of the region’s historic change: Mona Salem, Social Contract Centre (Egypt) and Abdulnabi Alekry, Bahrain Transparency Society.

Produced by Ryan Hicks and Manuel Medina

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